Tag Archives: Psychological Time

On how psychological time emerges from execution of actions in the environment

Jennifer T. Coull, Sylvie Droit-Volet, Explicit Understanding of Duration Develops Implicitly through Action, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Volume 22, Issue 10, 2018, Pages 923-937, DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2018.07.011.

Time is relative. Changes in cognitive state or sensory context make it appear to speed up or slow down. Our perception of time is a rather fragile mental construct derived from the way events in the world are processed and integrated in memory. Nevertheless, the slippery concept of time can be structured by draping it over more concrete functional scaffolding. Converging evidence from developmental studies of children and neuroimaging in adults indicates that we can represent time in spatial or motor terms. We hypothesise that explicit processing of time is mediated by motor structures of the brain in adulthood because we implicitly learn about time through action during childhood. Future challenges will be to harness motor or spatial representations of time to optimise behaviour, potentially for therapeutic gain.

A nice introduction to psychological time

Lindsey Drayton, Moran Furman, Thy Mind, Thy Brain and Time, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, olume 22, Issue 10, 2018, Pages 841-843 DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2018.08.007.

The passage of time has fascinated the human mind for millennia. Tools for measuring time emerged early in civilization: lunar calendars appear in the archeological record as far back as 10 000 years ago and water clocks some 6000 years ago. Later technological innovations such as mechanical clocks, and more recently atomic clocks, have allowed the tracking of time with ever-increasing precision. And yet, arguably, the most sophisticated ‘time piece’ is the brain. Our brains can not only track the duration and succession of events, but they can also coordinate complex motor movements at striking levels of precision; communicate effectively by generating and interpreting sounds and speech; determine how to maximize rewards over time in the face of uncertainty; reflect upon the past; plan for the future; respond to temporal regularities and irregularities in the environment; and adapt to change in temporal scales that range from millisecond resolution up to evolutionary processes spanning millions of years.