Tag Archives: Simulation

An interesting simulation educational software for control systems engineering based on controlling a quadrotor

S. Khan, M. H. Jaffery, A. Hanif and M. R. Asif, Teaching Tool for a Control Systems Laboratory Using a Quadrotor as a Plant in MATLAB, IEEE Transactions on Education, vol. 60, no. 4, pp. 249-256, DOI: 10.1109/TE.2017.2653762.

This paper presents a MATLAB-based application to teach the guidance, navigation, and control concepts of a quadrotor to undergraduate students, using a graphical user interface (GUI) and 3-D animations. The Simulink quadrotor model is controlled by a proportional integral derivative controller and a linear quadratic regulator controller. The GUI layout’s many components can be easily programmed to perform various experiments by considering the simulation of the quadrotor as a plant; it incorporates control systems (CS) fundamentals such as time domain response, transfer function and state-space form, pole-zero location, root locus, frequency domain response, steady-state error, position and disturbance response, controller design and tuning, unity, and the use of a Kalman filter as a feedback sensor. 3-D animations are used to display the quadrotor flying in any given condition selected by the user. For each simulation, users can view the output response in the form of 3-D animations, and can run time plots. The quadrotor educational tool (QET) helps students in the CS laboratory understand basic CS concepts. The QET was evaluated based on student feedback, grades, satisfaction, and interest in CS.

On how the simplification on physics made in computer games for real-time execution can explain the simplification on physics made by infants when understanding the world

Tomer D. Ullman, Elizabeth Spelke, Peter Battaglia, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Mind Games: Game Engines as an Architecture for Intuitive Physics, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Volume 21, Issue 9, 2017, Pages 649-665, DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2017.05.012.

We explore the hypothesis that many intuitive physical inferences are based on a mental physics engine that is analogous in many ways to the machine physics engines used in building interactive video games. We describe the key features of game physics engines and their parallels in human mental representation, focusing especially on the intuitive physics of young infants where the hypothesis helps to unify many classic and otherwise puzzling phenomena, and may provide the basis for a computational account of how the physical knowledge of infants develops. This hypothesis also explains several ‘physics illusions’, and helps to inform the development of artificial intelligence (AI) systems with more human-like common sense.

Sample-based approximation to POMDPs integrated with forward simulation for robot active exploration, with a nice related work about active exploration in robotics

Mikko Lauri, Risto Ritala, Planning for robotic exploration based on forward simulation, Robotics and Autonomous Systems, Volume 83, 2016, Pages 15-31, ISSN 0921-8890, DOI: 10.1016/j.robot.2016.06.008.

We address the problem of controlling a mobile robot to explore a partially known environment. The robot’s objective is the maximization of the amount of information collected about the environment. We formulate the problem as a partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP) with an information-theoretic objective function, and solve it applying forward simulation algorithms with an open-loop approximation. We present a new sample-based approximation for mutual information useful in mobile robotics. The approximation can be seamlessly integrated with forward simulation planning algorithms. We investigate the usefulness of POMDP based planning for exploration, and to alleviate some of its weaknesses propose a combination with frontier based exploration. Experimental results in simulated and real environments show that, depending on the environment, applying POMDP based planning for exploration can improve performance over frontier exploration.

Limitations of the simulation of physical systems when used in AI reasoning processes for prediction

Ernest Davis, Gary Marcus, The scope and limits of simulation in automated reasoning, Artificial Intelligence, Volume 233, April 2016, Pages 60-72, ISSN 0004-3702, DOI: 10.1016/j.artint.2015.12.003.

In scientific computing and in realistic graphic animation, simulation – that is, step-by-step calculation of the complete trajectory of a physical system – is one of the most common and important modes of calculation. In this article, we address the scope and limits of the use of simulation, with respect to AI tasks that involve high-level physical reasoning. We argue that, in many cases, simulation can play at most a limited role. Simulation is most effective when the task is prediction, when complete information is available, when a reasonably high quality theory is available, and when the range of scales involved, both temporal and spatial, is not extreme. When these conditions do not hold, simulation is less effective or entirely inappropriate. We discuss twelve features of physical reasoning problems that pose challenges for simulation-based reasoning. We briefly survey alternative techniques for physical reasoning that do not rely on simulation.